The perfect circle

When I started working with the magic circle, I had many difficulties mastering the perfect circle. It always came out a little edgy. I read a lot about it, and all I could find was that I had to randomize where I made my increases. But whenever I have to randomize something, my mind goes crazy!


So I found a way to make sense of it. Here it goes: If the stitches between the increases are an odd number, I start the round with the increase. If the stitches between the increases are an equal number, I start by dividing the amount by two, and only do the half before the first increase.


Sounds weird? Let me elaborate! Normally working a number of increases would look like this:


Round 1: 6 single crochets in magic ring

Round 2: Increase in every stitch x 6 (12)

Round 3: *1 sc, 1 increase* x 6 (18)

Round 4: *2 sc, 1 increase* x 6 (24)

Round 5: *3 sc, 1 increase* x 6 (30)

Round 6: *4 sc, 1 increase* x 6 (36)

Round 7: *5 sc, 1 increase* x 6 (42)

When done like that, the circle will look like the orange one on the picture below.


However, when done like the following, it will look like the pink one:


Round 1: 6 single crochets in magic ring

Round 2: Increase in every stitch x 6 (12)

Round 3: *1 increase, 1 sc* x 6 (18)

Round 4: *1 sc, 1 increase, 1 sc* x 6 (24)

Round 5: *1 increase, 3 sc* x 6 (30)

Round 6: *2 sc, 1 increase, 2 sc* x 6 (36)

Round 7: *1 increase, 5 sc* x 6 (42)


This way you place your increases equally around your work. It might not look like much of a difference, but these were only 7 rounds. Imagine if you had to do 15 or even 20 rounds of increases - you would end up with a hexagon!


I hope you found my guide useful!